I received an email from Google about GDPR. What do I do now?

I received an email from Google about GDPR. What do I do now?

You may have recently received an email from your Google Analytics account notifying you that you need to adjust your data collection settings to comply with GDPR. Like many business owners, especially those in the US, you may have found this email a bit confusing.

What Is GDPR?

GDPR is the General Data Protection Regulation. GDPR was created by the European Union. Its the EU’s answer on a years-old legal question about how data is used and whether individuals own the data that they create by interacting with websites online.

The courts ruled that individuals are the owners of their data, not the corporations (or websites) that collect the data. Therefore, the data must be deleted on a regular basis.

How Does GDPR affect the way I collect and retain data?

Great question. The answer will differ from business to business. The answer is rooted on whether you have clients or visitors from the EU and how you use your collected data in the course of business. For an expert recommendation on how to handle GDPR, please contact our Digital Media Specialist Harry Semerjian at harry@atrevenue.com. Don’t wait too long…Google has set a deadline of May 25th, 2018 to take action.

You can also contact us through the form below. Don't let your questions go unanswered!


Fix These Weak Spots in your Business Practices

Written By: Rebecca Berneck

We’ve noticed that most small businesses owners like yourself focus their attention on delivering their services and neglect the operations hoping things take care of themselves. Whether you’re a set-it-and-forget type or a diligent planner, the end of the year is a great time to look at your small business management practices and make certain nothing is falling through the cracks. In addition to reviewing your financial position, set aside some time to review two aspects of your business operations: bookkeeping and document management.

Bookkeeping

Bookkeeping can be tedious and confusing. While it appears straightforward, (money coming in is income; money going out is an expense) properly categorizing everything can require a solid background in bookkeeping. However, with good bookkeeping, you’ll be able to generate accurate financial reports. These reports help you clearly see things like where you’re making the most money and what expenses are the highest. You’ll also get a good sense of your cashflow position, arguably the lifeblood of any business.

If your bookkeeping is messy and you can’t generate clean financial statements, then you can’t effectively plan for the future. If you’re using Excel to track your business finances, it might be time to consider upgrading to QuickBooks. And, if you’re already on QuickBooks, review your chart of accounts and your products and services list, archiving ones you don’t use anymore and combining duplicates.

Document Management

All businesses generate invoices, payment reminder letters, sales brochures, emails, balance sheets, spreadsheets, and reports; all are necessary to running your business. Small business document management refers to how you create, share, organize and store these documents for your business. With effective document management, you’ll be more efficient with your time and more consistent with your client experience.

Clean out your filing cabinet and remove documents that you no longer need on hand. You can destroy unneeded documents and rotate files you need to keep to a long-term storage solution. Like your filing cabinet, it might be time to go through your hard drive or cloud storage solution, removing files you don’t need and archiving completed projects.

If all of your documents such as receipts, bills, invoices, proposals and estimates are all over the place or crammed in shoe boxes, it’s time to consider an online document management solution. Tools such as Dropbox and Hubdoc coupled with a document scanner help you manage, organize and archive your business documents.

Lastly, if you use templates for sales emails, proposals, estimates and invoices then review them now to make certain all of the information is current and consistent across documents. While it may seem trivial, a consistent look and feel across client facing documentation instills a sense of trust in you and your business.


3 Reasons Why That Newsletter is So Important

Email marketing can do a lot for small businesses. It helps nurture new leads, drives sales, promotes products and services, and builds loyalty. Notice how I mentioned more than just sales? That’s because marketing isn’t only about the bottom line, but contributing to the bottom line. Some email messages, such as promotions, are specifically designed to drive sales, but others, such as newsletters have other important functions.

Here are 3 things email newsletters do to help your business:

1.     Keep your business top of mind. Newsletters are a great way to keep your business in the forefront of your customer’s mind by simply being there. Email is one of the most efficient and effective ways of getting your brand in front of your audience, and newsletters are a great and consistent way to get their attention.

57% of email subscribers spend

10-60 minutes browsing marketing emails during the week.

(Source: today  willChoozOn)

Yes, we get a lot of emails, but we all spend time browsing, reviewing and evaluating them. Make sure your business has visibility where your customers are spending their time.

2.     Engage your audience. Newsletters are great for customer engagement when they are full of information that customers want to read. Why would you want to engage your audience? The more engagement with your business, the more customers connect. The deeper that connection, the more likely they are to purchase.

63% of people requesting information on today will not purchase

for at least three months, and 20% will take more than 12 months to buy.

(Source: Marketing Donut)

Statistics like this reminds us that the customer journey is just that – a journey. Customers need time to make purchasing decisions. By engaging your audience through the purchase decision, you have a far better chance of them ultimately buying from you.

3.     Deepen your relationship with customers. Newsletters are all about providing information to your customer. In our customer-centric environment, this communication is critical to help build the relationship. Plus, they are a great way to share your business values, differentiators and personality. Allowing your customers to learn more about you and your company improves loyalty and increases sales.

When asked which medium consumers would like to receive updates from,

90% preferred an email newsletter, while only 10% chose Facebook.

(Source: Nielsen Norman Group)

If good marketing is talking to the right audience, with the right message, at the right time, why not send a newsletter? The more connected the audience is, the more they begin to view your business less as a commodity and more as a partnership.

Newsletters are just one of the many different types of email marketing messages businesses can send. If you would like to learn more about email marketing and how it can help your business, contact our team today!